8 of the prettiest mews streets in London

London may not evoke the same romantic sentiment as say Paris or Venice, but in picturesque areas like Notting Hill, Kensington or Chelsea, it can compete with the quaintest inner-city streets anywhere in the world.

Mews are narrow little streets, often found along quiet cobbled lanes, with next to no road traffic. These houses were built in the 18th and 19th century for stabling horses with servants stationed in accommodation above.

London Mews
Today though, mews houses have been beautifully restored to provide everything you need for a chic 21st century lifestyle.

You’re most likely to find a row of traditional mews houses tucked away behind grand mansions in some of London’s most exclusive areas. Here are just a few of the most gorgeous mews streets you can find in the UK capital:

Kynance Mews

Kynance Mews is defined by its picturesque entrance and pastel-coloured cottages, with the most notable being an ivy-draped dream house. The actual street is split into two sections, with the shorter stretch to the West of Launceston Place and the longer part to the East.

Launceston Place

We may as well tell you more about this one seeing as we just mentioned it. Kensington’s Launceston Place can be found just down from Kynance Mews and is widely regarded as one of the prettiest mews streets in all of London.

Again, you’ll find ivy-covered houses, but also a secret staircase that leads up to a local church. Additionally, Launceston Place boasts arches so lush that you’ll almost feel like you’re walking through a fantastical portal into a storybook land.

Stanhope Mews

Houses in this little cobbled street near Gloucester Road Tube Station in South Kensington are always adorned with eye-poppingly colourful flowers that make for stunning souvenir snaps.

Queens’ Gate Mews

Also just off Gloucester Road, Queen’s Gate Mews boasts lovely radiant buildings, some with dainty iron balconies and it makes for a great refreshment spot with The Queen’s Arms pub at the end of the street.

Notting Hill

Anyone who has seen the 1999 film of the same name will probably expect the area to be awash with magnificent mews and they’d be right. Spots of note include Simon Close, just off Portobello Road, which features a duck egg blue house with red roses flourishing outside.

Notting Hill Mews
While you’re in the area, it’s also worth investigating Colville Mews, which boasts some rather striking shops amongst the lovely houses, particularly the Union flag-emblazoned Temperley London.

Atherstone Mews

Mews streets can pop up in the most unexpected of places like Atherstone Mews, which sits just around the corner from the Natural History Museum, placing it well within walking distance from the Grand Royale Hotel Hyde Park London hotel.

It is one of the most colourful mews in the city, with pastel shades of blue, yellow, purple and pink adorning the houses.

Prince’s Gate Mews

Near Atherstone Mews, just behind the Victoria & Albert Museum, is another colour-rich stretch: Prince’s Gate Mews.

The mews is split into three sections, with part of the address in Kensington and the rest in Westminster. Remarkably for a central London location, some of the houses on Prince’s Gate Mews boast car parking garages, which is supremely handy for anyone who has ever tried to park in this area.

Ennismore Garden Mews

Finally, Ennismore Garden Mews sits just two minutes away from Prince’s Gate Mews. With its cobbled road and dinky iron balconies, we defy you to walk down this stretch without falling in love with at least one house.

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