LONDON’S MOST ICONIC SCULPTURES

Take a short walk around any part of London and it won’t be too long before you stumble across a sculpture. Whether it’s one of the famous ones that everyone has heard of a lesser known piece of work that’s a hidden gem, it seems as though London sculptures are everywhere.

So, how do you know what sculptures are worth checking out? We’ve compiled a list of some of our favourites to get you started.

Nelson’s Ship In A Bottle, 2010

By Yinka Shonibare

Yinka Shonibare’s ‘Nelson’s Ship In A Bottle’ is a scale replica of HMS Victory, a famous battleship. Nelson is often credited as being one of Britain’s greatest officers and a key part of building the empire. This sculpture showcases some of Britain’s history in a modern way. It is currently on show at The National Maritime Museum.

Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain in London

Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain, 1893

By Alfred Gilbert

You may not have heard of ‘Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain’ but you are sure to have heard of ‘Eros’, as it is more commonly referred to by Londoners. Gilbert’s sculpture from 1893 is one of London’s most iconic but, ironically, nobody is too sure if it depicts Eros or Anteros. It can be found in Piccadilly Circus.

ArcelorMittal Orbit, 2012

By Anish Kapoor

Despite only being created a few years ago for the London Olympics, ‘ArcelorMittal Orbit’ has quickly gained popularity. This sculpture is more than just something to look at, it’s actually Britain’s largest sculpture and houses the world’s highest tunnel slide. ‘ArcelorMittal Orbit’ is located in Stratford so you’ll need to jump on the train to travel from your room at the Grand Royale London Hyde Park Hotel. It is definitely worth a visit if you have the time and are a fan of sculpture and art.

Trafalgar Square Lions, 1867

By Edwin Landseer

The lions at Trafalgar Square can’t be missed and are an instantly recognisable symbol of the city of London. Located just beneath Nelson’s Column, the sculptures are large and command attention by their size and scale. There are four lions in total. They are bronze and were sculpted by Sir Edwin Landseer. If you’re looking for a famous landmark to snap a selfie, these four majestic Kings of the Jungle have had plenty of practise – they are a popular photo hotspot.

London Trafalgar Square Lion in UK england

Newton, 1993

By Eduardo Paolozzi

Outside the British Library you will find ‘Newtown’, a sculpture by Eduardo Paolozzi. Newtown represents traditional thought and order for many, and so it’s a good fit for the British Library. The British Library is a short tube journey from the Grand Royale London Hyde Park Hotel.

There are many other iconic sculptures in London, a lot of which can be found just by wandering around some of London’s most popular areas. Staying at the Grand Royale London will put you in a prime location for all things art and design. Get in touch today to find out more.

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